Chiarina Loggia

A printmaker's progress


2 Comments

Tuesday Tales – Summer’s End


Summer's End

Summer’s End

As we cherish the last few days of summer, there is a crispness in the air that brings on feelings of nostalgia for times gone by.

This piece was created for my first solo show, In Her Eyes, and I talked about doing the photo shoot that produced this image in the lead-up to the show. As I look at it now, I am reminded of the tremendous fun and feelings of empowerment that the shoot engendered. More than that, I am reminded of a  friend that I cherish and, hopefully, honour with this piece. The title of the piece was inspired by this Foo Fighters song of the same name. It has that same feeling of nostalgia and remembrance.

That first solo show was over four years ago and it’s been over three years since my last one.  Perhaps it’s time to think about doing another.

Summer’s End, an 8″x10″ photopolymer gravure etching on 15″x20″ paper, is offered this week at $250.
Contact me at chiarina@chiarina.com for further info or if you’d like to purchase it.

Advertisements


2 Comments

What You Build


What You Build

What You Build

It has been a while since I have posted about my artwork. Family matters have kept me occupied and away from my computer. It has been a good time, with my son getting married and my sisters coming for an extended visit, but it has ended on a bittersweet note with a lot of departures, including both of my children leaving for parts East as they embark on new adventures. My house, a-flurry with people and belongings for several months, is now a quiet refuge from which I can refocus my creative energies.

When thinking about a piece to present for my Tuesday Tales postings, this piece kept coming into my head, yet, for the longest time, I couldn’t fathom why. It is an older piece, almost five years old, which was part of my first solo show, entitled In Her Eyes. I have talked about that show here, here and here. This is a small image of my son, the photo taken while he was rebuilding our deck, hence the protective glasses. The title, What You Build, alludes to not only what he is doing but to the act, and art, of building a life, hopefully surrounded by family and loved ones. As I thought about the title I realized why this piece kept coming into my mind. With all the recent events and changes in my life I was naturally thinking about the life I had built around and for my children. And just as my son learned the tools and techniques to build a deck I knew that he had developed the tools needed to build his life as a married man, and I hoped that I had helped in that process.

It struck me, though, that I was not only thinking of my family but about my art and this blog. What You Build had been one of many works in a show in which community played a tremendous role. While a significant focus of my blog has been to share and document my art and art process, I now see that an equally important goal for me is to build a community, one that loves to share and revel in the creative force that lies in all of us. And I see that the communication has been woefully one sided and focused on my perspectives. So I have decided to change things up a bit and post more spontaneously on art related subjects, spotlighting not only my own but the creative works of others and welcoming greater imput and discussion from my readers. I will continue to post my Tuesday Tales as new works are created but these posts will be less regular.

So with this in mind, I welcome you, dear readers, to share some fabulous creative work you have done or come across recently.

And today I would like to share this post, Waiting For Michael, about Kate McGloughlin, a painter/printmaker whose work I came just across. Not only is her work wonderful, but the post eloquentfully illustrates the healing power of art.

 


2 Comments

Tuesday Tales – We Are All Made of Stars


Stardust

Stardust

Starlight

Starlight

Starglass

Starglass

These three pieces are from a series of small, four inch square monotypes I made, using the ghost imagery of the previous work to build upon for the next. I created the works using two mylar circles of varying sizes which I inked and placed in different parts of the square whole. I used only two colors, black and yellow ochre in the pieces. The textures were created both by the printing process and the use of talcum powder as a resist. I liked the translucency achieved and from the first monotype I knew I would be creating heavenly bodies in space.

I once had the chance to chat with a Hungarian astronaut who had been out in space. I asked him about the light out there and he told me it was extraordinary yet hard to describe. It had a brightness and clarity that was not perceivable on earth because of our atmosphere, and it filled up space, with the dark areas serving as a wonderful foil to the light. I thought of this as I made these pieces, remembering that space was not dark and empty but a place filled with light and possibility.

I turned these pieces into the triptych below, wrapping the paper around wooden blocks, and called it Stars 3. The pieces are available individually for $50 each or all three for $110.

Stars 3

Stars 3

You can contact me at chiarina@chiarina.com to purchase or for further information.


6 Comments

Tuesday Tales – Making My Mark


Bookmarks 1

Bookmarks 1-5

I love bookmarks. I enjoy finding those with special artworks at galleries and bookstores.  I find the artwork enhances the reading experience immensely for it begins and ends the reading session with a lovely visual experience. I especially enjoy handmake bookmarks created with care by artists I admire.

I began making my own bookmarks a few years back when I decided to recycle some older, less successful artwork and sell them for a few dollars at my studio tour. They were good sellers, so I slowly improved on them until I finally arrived at the ones I do today. These are no longer cut up old works but instead are images from carefully selected segments of etching plates that I feel work well in the long vertical format. I ink each plate especially for the bookmark with my oil-based inks and I print them on 300lb Arches watercolour paper, using the lovely natural deckel edge for the bottom of the bookmark. This paper is very firm and durable, yet takes the print beautifully under the etching press after being softened with water. The bookmarks are left to dry under a heavy weight overnight, allowing them to return to their beautiful firmness.

Each bookmark is unique, just like my prints, for each one is inked with its own, unreproduceable blend of colors. In fact I like to call them mini art scrolls, for they resemble the Asian style of painting on long vertical paper scrolls. The long vertical format is also quite popular with art galleries when announcing their shows on banners. These banners often show a cropped glimpse of the artwork on display inside. When I saw the banners below in front of the Louvre in Paris I was inspired to do the same on a much smaller scale.

Louvre, France

Louvre, France

Hence some of the figurative bookmarks below.

Bookmarks 2

Bookmarks 6-9

Bookmarks are in essence my own mini announcements, giving the purchaser a glimpse into my creative world. They make excellent small gifts on their own or add a special touch tucked inside a book. My website is written in pencil at the bottom on the back, leaving lots of room for a personal inscription. The bookmarks above and below are the latest batch I have completed.  They are numbered left to right for easy identification. They are 7″ x 2 1/4″ and are offered at $10 each or three for $25. They come packaged in individual, fitted, clear plastic sleeves.  Previous bookmarks were shown here. Many have been sold, but if you would like any of those images or more than one of the same image of any bookmark, I can make them to order, though each will have it’s own distinctive , and somewhat unpredictable coloring.  Please contact me at chiarina@chiarina.com if you would like to purchase any of these.

Bookmarks 10-15

Bookmarks 10-14

Bookmarks 16-18

Bookmarks 15-18

 


2 Comments

Tuesday Tales – Morning Tea


Ocha No Asa, center

Ocha No Asa, center

                                                                                  Fuji cools the sky
                                                                          Reflected in the rice fields
                                                                                            I sip my o-cha

Ocha No Asa (Morning Tea) is an artist book I made a few years back. It is quite a complex piece which depicts one of my favorite subjects, tea, in one of my favorite places, Japan. The tea cups above and below are shaped after some I bought in Japan. These above are placed on a backdrop of Mount Fuji, Japan’s highest and most famous mountain. Its peak was visible from my first apartment in Tokyo, rising gloriously over the cityscape in the most amazing sunsets.

The calligraphy panels on either side are reminiscent of waka, classical Japanese poetry that is visually evocative and often difficult to decifer for the artistic rendering of the words.

Ocha No Asa, center

Ocha No Asa, center

The front panels of the book, see below, echoes the noren, or divided hangings, found at the entrance of restaurants. The circle is a common symbol found on noren. These panels are meant to open and invite you in for a cup of tea.

Ocha No Asa, front

Ocha No Asa, front

The back of the book features two more cups, collaged handmade papers and the title of the book in both Romaji and Japanese hiragana.

Ocha No Asa, back view

Ocha No Asa, back view

Ocha No Asa, back

Ocha No Asa, back

Ocha No Asa, an 8″x7″ artist book, is offered this week for $150. You can contact me at chiarina@chiarina.com for further info or to purchase.


Leave a comment

Tuesday Tales – In Their Element


In Their Element

In Their Element

In Their Element is an image of a place nearby that is not easily accessed. The beach depicted is privately owned and is one of many tiny gems on this lovely property. The place is Point No Point, a resort on Vancouver Island that is so named for its many points, none of which extend further than any other, hence the unusual name. The resort has a series of trails that lead through forest paths to several lookouts and beautiful beaches with crashing waves. It is an altogether magical place. My images of Point No Point can be seen here.

For this print I decided to reverse the image so that the sea was on the left. I also warmed up the colors of the rocks to compliment the blue of the sea. The  rocks jut into prominence yet the angles and waves draw you into the picture to arrive at the man and his dog, who are not immediately noticed at first, but who lend a life and sense of scale to the landscape.

In Their Element, a 5″x10″ photopolymer gravure etching on 11″x14″ paper, is offered this week at $90 unframed. Contact me at chiarina@chiarina.com to purchase or for further information.


Leave a comment

Tuesday Tales – Tsukubai


Tsukubai

Tsukubai

A tsukubai is a small basin usually set at the entrance to Buddhist temples and gardens in Japan. They are meant for a ritual washing of the hands as an act of purification, often before entering into the tea ceremony room. The use of natural materials, such as stone for the basin and bamboo for the cups and cup rests reflect the Buddhist appreciation for nature. The low height of the basin requires the visitor to crouch thereby encouraging humility and reverence. In fact the word tsukubai means “to crouch”. Sometimes the water for a tsukubai will be piped in through a bamboo reed, the shishi-odoshi, which falls onto another levered piece of bamboo that, when filled drops down and then rebounds with a clack onto the stone. The repetition of this sound of water falling and the sharp clap has a meditative effect. It’s power is shown famously in the beautifully filmed fight scene from the movie, Kill Bill, below. You can hear the shishi-odoshi at the start of the scene and it gains prominence around the 5 minute mark.

The tsukubai in my piece was shot in Japan when I lived there. The photograph was very dark but I loved the composition with the criss-crossing lines and reflections. The darkness of the image allowed me to bring up lots of texture which was enhanced by the single exposure technique I used in creating the photo etching plate. Inking the plate had its own challenges for both lights and darks were washed out and I had to paint some of the lines and color back in. This resulted in a more painterly and abstracted image in the final print which I am quite happy with.

Tsukubai is a 9″x12″ mixed-media monoprint wrapped around an 8″x10″x1.5″ board, so the edges of the image are on the sides of the board, as shown below.

Tsukubai

Tsukubai

It is offered this week for $100. Please contact me at chiarina@chiarina.com to purchase or for further info.